But you should know that the reason for the revitalization of the virus is not in the weather conditions, and lowered immunity, so the virus can cause inflammation and stress, and upset stomach, and excessive use of alcohol, and fatigue. valtrex who have firsthand experience with herpes, know that "favorite" place of its location - it's rim lip, but the rash can also occur in the oral cavity: on the gums, inside the cheeks and lips, and even on the nose, cheeks, in the ears, the forehead.
Steering Committee

Steering Committee

Founder/Executive Director

Kylar W. Broadus is a professor, attorney, activist and public speaker from Missouri. He is an associate professor of business law at Lincoln University of Missouri, a historically black college where he previously served as chair of the business department. Kylar has maintained a general practice of law in Columbia, Missouri since 1997. In 2011, Kylar was awarded the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force’s Sue J. Hyde Award for Longevity in the Movement and the Pioneer Award at the Transfaith of Color Conference presented by the Freedom Center of Social Justice. He was featured in BlackEnterprise.com and previously in Diversity, Inc.

In 2010, Kylar founded Trans People of Color Coalition (TPOCC), the only national civil rights organization dedicated to the needs of Trans People of Color. In 2010, Kylar was appointed as a Division Director of the Section on Individual Rights and Responsibilities an American Bar Association Committee and Co-Chair for the Committee on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity. He has spoken at numerous law schools throughout the country including most recently the University of Mississippi, Washington University, St. Louis University, Tulane, Harvard, Temple, University of Missouri-Columbia, and Georgetown as well as numerous colleges and conferences. In addition, he authored the essay "The Evolution of Employment Discrimination Protections for Transgender People", published in "Transgender Rights", the first of its kind by Currah, Juang, Minter 2006. He is published in the Temple Law Journal and numerous other publications. He is currently in the film “Still Black: A Portrait of Black Transmen.” He currently serves on the board of the National Black Justice Coalition and was board chair from 2007 to 2010. He has served on the board of directors of the National Stonewall Democrats from 1998 until 2002, and served as the interim secretary from January to May 2001. He served three terms on the City of Columbia's Human Rights Commission and two terms on the board of the statewide GLBT advocacy group, PROMO: For the Personal Rights of Missourians with the last year being as Vice-President.

Broadus is a founding board member of a national think tank, The Transgender Law and Policy Institute. In August 2005, Broadus along with two other panelists were the first to present information before the American Bar Association regarding Transgender clients. In 2004, he spoke at the Regional Affirmative Action Conference on Transgender Issues and Affirmative Action. In January of 2003, Broadus was called before the American Association of Law Schools on transgender issues. Kylar speaks and lobbies on the national, state and local levels in the areas of transgender and sexual orientation law and advocacy. He has also been featured on local and national television and radio and offers diversity and leadership trainings throughout the United States to schools, colleges, employers, government agencies and businesses. Formerly, State Legislative Manager and Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign, in Washington, DC. Kylar worked for State Farm Insurance Companies from 1989 to 1997. He is a 1988 graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law and obtained his B.S. in Business Administration from Central Methodist University in Fayette, Missouri.

Advisory Council

Cecilia Chung is nationally recognized as a civil rights leader, advocating for HIV/AIDS awareness and care, LGBT equality, social justice and human rights. She is currently a Human Rights Commissioner in San Francisco where she was the first trans woman and first person living openly with HIV elected Chair. An immigrant from Hong Kong, Cecilia has lived in San Francisco for over 20 years where she has worked locally and internationally to advance equality and justice. During that time, she has broken ground in a number of ways including: being the first transgender woman and first Asian to be elected to lead the Board of Directors of the San Francisco Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Celebration; the first transgender woman and first person living openly with HIV to Chair the San Francisco Human Rights Commission; and, an architect of the nation’s most ambitious publicly funded program addressing economic justice within the transgender community.

For almost two decades, she has worked to advance equality and justice both locally and internationally. In 1994 she was a member of the Transgender Discrimination Taskforce, which released a groundbreaking report by the San Francisco Human Rights Commission, documenting widespread discrimination against trans people. The report led the City to adopt many pioneering anti-discrimination ordinances and policies. She is the former Deputy Director of the Transgender Law Center, has also served on a number of planning bodies, including the San Francisco HIV Health Services Planning Council, and was a trainer of Community Planning for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). In 2001, she was elected President of the Board of Directors of San Francisco Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Celebration, becoming the first Asian and first trans gender women to hold the position, and she lead the Board to a new standard of inclusion and excellence. In 2004, as a founding producer of Trans March, she helped organize one of the world’s largest annual trans events. Cecilia has dedicated herself to ending stigma, discrimination, and violence in all communities.

Advisory Council

Nicole Garcia was born, raised and educated in Boulder Colorado. She was named Michael at birth and lived as a male for the first 42 years of her life. In 2003, Nicole realized the pain, anguish, and depression that plagued her was the result of the internal battle she waged during her entire life. Nicole came to the realization that she had to transition from Michael to Nicole. With the help of God, Nicole has blossomed into a strong, confident, transgender Latina.
Nicole was able to transition while working as a law enforcement officer. There were challenges, but with careful planning and a supportive administration, Nicole was able to retain her position and is in her 15th year as a sworn peace officer. Because of the changing dynamics of her life, Nicole is now pursuing a master's degree in counseling at the University of Colorado Denver. In her spare time, Nicole is an active social, religious, and political activist. She is the co-chair of the board of directors of Lutherans Concerned/North America (LC/NA).The mission statement of LC/NA states: " Working at the intersection of oppressions, LC/NA embodies, inspires, advocates and organizes for the acceptance and full participation of people of all sexual orientations and gender identities within the Lutheran communion and its ecumenical and global partners."
Nicole is a member of the Latino/a Roundtable of the Pacific School of Religion, Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies in Ministry and Religion. She is also a member of TransFaith Online, an association of transgender religious leaders. It may be obvious, but to be clear, Nicole is devoted to proclaiming the Gospel of Jesus Christ to those who were told by others that they were not good enough to sit at God's table. She credits her faith for leading her into a full and rewarding life as Nicole. For Nicole, Jesus is the Son of God, but she realizes that God is infinite and all powerful - God appears in everyone's life in different ways. She respects all religious and spiritual practices and celebrates with anyone who accepts a higher power in their lives.

Deputy Director

Parker T. Hurley, LMSW, is a queer, mixed race, trans-activist committed to bringing visibility to the disparities in access to health care, social services and education to dually stigmatized and otherwise marginalized communities . Parker holds a Bachelors of Arts from Long Island University/Brooklyn Campus in Social Work and graduated with a Masters degree from Hunter College School of Social Work, with a concentration in community organizing. He has provided advocacy and support within LGBTQQ communities in the NYC area to individuals with major mental illness, people of color and seniors.
Parker is currently the LGBTQA Coordinator at Guilford College and oversees the direction of The Bayard Rustin Center for LGBTQA Education, Activism and Reconciliation, while pursuing a PhD at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, in Educational Studies with a concentration in Higher Education.  Prior to enrolling at UNCG, Parker served as the Member Services and Outreach Coordinator of the Rainbow Heights Club. The Rainbow Heights Club, located in Brooklyn, NY, is the only government funded psychosocial and advocacy organization specifically meeting the needs of LGBT individuals living with severe mental illness. During that time, he worked in collaboration with providers, educators and activists throughout the state of New York to develop an experiential LGBT cultural competency curriculum and successfully training over 2,000 students, healthcare, and mental health providers, whose end goal was to promote LGBT inclusive services. Parker has conducted LGBTQQ cultural competency trainings in a myriad of settings including: hospitals, mental health clinics, conferences, high schools, colleges and universities throughout the east coast. And has also served as an lead organizer in various local, collectively-run transgender and queer people of color organizations. His passions lie within the healing and transformation of our homes, schools and communities, through self-care, radical love, and working exhaustively at the intersections of all social justice movements.

Advisory Council

Rej Joo is a Korean-American who has been working in the LGBTQ comunities (LGBTQ homeless youth, Asian LGBTQ, and the trans) for 8 years as a community leader, educator, and a youth advocate. Currently, he is active with Dari Project ( organization that provides resources for LGBTQ people of Korean descent and their loved ones) in NYC while planning to return to school for a MPH.

Communications/ Community Outreach

Samantha is a senior and Communications major at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland where she served as the Community Service and Outreach Coordinator of the school’s queer student alliance, Rainbow Soul, from 2008-2010. Under her leadership, Rainbow Soul: built coalitions with several student organizations to foster a more tolerant campus climate through community service; encouraged and empowered students using political advocacy; created Pride and Soul Week, a week-long celebration of LGBT history and awareness, the first of its kind at an HBCU campus. Samantha has also served as an  Equality Federation intern, creating Get Up, Come Out, and Get Active - an advocacy training designed for LGBTQ youth, and organizer and facilitator of Morgan’s first-ever trans-identity and inclusion panel.Most recently, Samantha authored An Open Letter to Roland Martin discussing homophobia and gender binary within communities of color which was featured by both GLAAD and The Root. She has been honored for student-activism and leadership, and hopes that her work and the work of her peers will eradicate homophobia and transphobia on HBCU campuses.

Advisory Council

Louis “L.J.” Mitchell was born and raised in Los Angeles, California, and comes from a long line of people who believe that community building and community service are important Christian values.
Rev. Mitchell and his wife, Krysia L. Villón, moved to the Pioneer Valley in Massachusetts in 2001. Louis is committed to struggles for fairness, equity, respect and self-determination.  Using his own learned experience, a broad range of resources, theories and studies, he brings a fresh, “on the ground”, open-hearted, holistic strategy to the work of individual and community healing.  Using his own life experiences and varied work, volunteer, social justice and ministry experiences, Louis seeks to share a vision of intersectional thinking and brings a commitment to inclusion and mutuality to each setting that he’s invited to. Louis has had a long history of service with various agencies and boards, including as the first “out” transgender-identified Board member of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and as a founding member of Lesbians and Gays of African Descent for Democratic Action.

Louis was recently featured in the documentary, Still Black: A Portrait of Black Transmen, is a featured blogger for Many Voices, as well as many articles through the years.  He serves as the engagement coordinator for the Interfaith Working Group, is a board member of the Freedom Center for Social Justice and current program co-chair for the Trans Faith in Color Conference, a member of  National Black Justice Coalition’s Leadership Advisory Council, a founding member of The Fellowship of Affirming Ministries’ Trans-Saints and serving as their East Coast Regional Minister, and as a founding member of the Trans-People of Color Coalition.

Mr. Mitchell was the co-founder of Recovering the Promise Ministries in Springfield, Massachusetts. Louis was recently honored as the recipient of the 2011 Haystack Award from the Massachusetts Conference of the UCC for his work in Social Justice and Social Ministry.  He was further honored to be selected to be the Keynote Speaker for the inaugural Black Transmen, Inc. Conference and the Philadelphia Trans Health Conference in 2012.

Louis lives in daily gratitude for the reconciliation, restoration and grace of a loving God that surpasses all of his needs!

Advocacy Communications & Outreach

Monica, aka the TransGriot, is a native Houstonian and a trailblazing award winning trans community leader.
She has lobbied since 1998 for trans human rights protections at the federal, state and local levels in Kentucky and Texas. In 2006 she became the third African-American trans person and the first African-American Texan to be given the IFGE Trinity Award, the transgender community’s highest meritorious service award

Spiritual & Religious Outreach, Director

Public advocacy has served as a foundation for Mykal’s personal and professional life, having spent several years fighting as an attorney for civil rights protections for workers, students, and renters at places like the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund and the ACLU LGBT Rights & HIV/AIDS Rights Projects.  He felt a different calling on his life, and so left law practice to attend Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, where he became a Point Foundation Scholar and graduated in May 2007 with a Master of Divinity degree in pastoral ministry and theology and a focus on liturgical studies and vocal/gospel music. He recently completed his clergy candidacy at Vision of Hope Metropolitan Community Church, a multi-site church in Mountville, Reading and York, PA, where he also served as its Director of Worship and Congregational Care.  Mykal is now a community minister and bridge-builder in Boston, MA, lecturing, preaching and developing a consultative ministry for communities of faith who wish to become truly welcoming to their LGBT siblings.  And in his spare time, he produces and performs in events that raise much-needed funds for gender-confirmation surgeries for his Transgender siblings.